Sign up for the Single Serve Coffee mailing list and be eligible to win prizes given away to mailing list members.

Dissassembly + Repair Guide - Keurig B70 Platinum

OPOD, Bunn My Cafe, Senseo, Home Cafe, Keurig, Melitta One:One

Moderators: jbviau, NDJollyMon

Re: Dissassembly + Repair Guide - Keurig B70 Platinum

Postby GetSet » Mon Dec 24, 2012 10:33 am

I have a B66 that has been working with no problems for over 2 years. Recently, we woke up to find that it's menu was blank, and the machine was completely unresponsive. After I wrote this (apologetically) lengthy post, I found that shocktube had already experienced this problem and solution and posted it in this thread [mod note: see here], but I still think that the details I recorded could help explain some things.

Initially, I found that the transformer had an open primary winding. I located this post http://www.fixya.com/support/t8104596-need_14_5_volt that was a great help because as a result of it I found that my transformer was repairable. I determined that the thermal fuse inside the transformer was bad. Because the fellow on FIXYA apparently lost track of the winding connection when he dug too deep to remove the thermal fuse, I decided it was unnecessary to remove it since it was open and effectively no longer existed anyway. I stopped peeling when I got access to the wires - there are 3 of them - and checked them with a meter to see where to connect my new thermal fuse. I went with his suggestion and used the Radio Shack 270-1322. I covered it with heat shrink to prevent shorting and placed it against the metal transformer frame.

After this, the Keurig worked just fine, until it started to get confused and kept reverting to the MENU display that has the setup options, instead of staying in the brew menu. I checked the transformer and found it was very hot. Was the transformer bad? After measuring it's current output with a clamp-on current meter and finding that it was very high, I started looking elsewhere - shorted bridge diode or regulator in the regulator/driver board? No. In desperation, I finally started unplugging some of the smaller connectors on this board while monitoring the transformer current output. When I unplugged what turned out to be one of the solenoid valves, the current draw went down tremendously. So the culprit was really the solenoid valve and not the transformer - the thermal fuse just did it's job like it was supposed to.

There are 2 valves, both P/N SH-V0829BC-R(C1) DC12V. 100mA. 0929. The one that is tee'd into the water supply line to the hot water tank started to intermittently short out and draw a lot of current, as much as 850 mA, but both the current and resistance would fluctuate. The lowest observed resistance was about 8 ohms (WAY too low). This exceeded the current capacity of the voltage regulator, but fortunately it never failed. The poor transformer, which is rated for no more than 470 mA on it's secondary, was putting out as much as 1.5 amps due to the load of the valve shorting out. The display won't stay in the brew menu when this is happening. Instead, it keeps reverting to the MENU display that has the setup options. This happens because the main 12V supply is being drug down so low that the brain gets confused (it measured about 8 volts at one point). As the short got worse, the display got very dim. Unplugging this valve would immediately clear the problem and the machine would appear to work fine. The valve never leaked at all, and functioned just fine otherwise since I could hear it clicking. You had to look twice to see the small amount of brown corrosion at the periphery of the seal at the terminal lug end of the valve. This is another case of moisture leakage on these valves that were not designed for fluids, only this time it resulted in the valve shorting itself out.

When the valve would short, it would get very hot and so would the transformer. My new thermal fuse should have blown, but in it's new position I apparently couldn't provide enough heat conductivity to it. I had to enclose the thermal fuse with heat shrink because it's case is electrically connected to one of the leads; perhaps this insulated it from the transformer heat too much. I began to realize that because of this, none of the electronics from the power supply through to the control circuit and valves had any protection whatsoever, should something like this happen again. Since I had a 500 mA slow blow fuse handy (and even a fuse holder for it) I cut one of the the blue secondary leads of the transformer and inserted the fuse in series there. The transformer is rated at 470 mA maximum, so the 500 mA fuse is holding fine, but I have confidence that it will blow if it ever needs to.

Note that this failure happened at night, WITH THE MACHINE TURNED COMPLETELY OFF. Other people have posted that they have woke up to a dead coffee machine as well. Normally the transformer and power supply are constantly operating, even with the machine shut off, and so are the two valves. So here is the scenario: In the middle of the night, the valve not only shorts out but gets very hot. So does the voltage regulator and transformer. If not for the thermal fuse inside the transformer, there could eventually be smoke.

My advice to anyone whose machine has a menu that seems confused, unresponsive, or dim: Check the temperature of the two solenoid valves. They should feel warm, but not hot enough to burn your fingers. I know that other things can cause unresponsiveness, but this is a simple check if you already have the machine apart.

While I had the machine apart I opened the water pump. It was in perfect condition. Since I had disconnected the pump, I pulled the check valve out and cleaned the tiny bit of buildup out of it with a long cleaning Q-tip. I pulled the black disk shaped mesh filter out and cleaned it with a strong stream of water. I had a similar one of these in my riding lawn mower and cleaned it the same way. Since it just has a metal screen inside, it is cleanable and reusable this way.

I bought 3 of the SH-V0829BC valves from Skycraft Parts and they all tested OK. They come with cut vinyl tubes still installed, so they really were cut out of equipment - not new. However, Skycraft says that they were cut out of equipment that was never put into service, whatever that means. The one I installed in the machine has been working fine for a week now as of this writing :P .
Last edited by jbviau on Mon Dec 24, 2012 11:40 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Reason: Mod note: link added
GetSet
 
Posts: 21
Joined: Mon Dec 24, 2012 2:13 am
Location: Greenville, TX

Re: Dissassembly + Repair Guide - Keurig B70 Platinum

Postby jbviau » Mon Dec 24, 2012 11:43 pm

^^^ Great first post! Welcome.
Josh - Forum Moderator
----------------------------
Bunn Trifecta MB, Nespresso D90, Baratza Preciso and OE LIDO(s), and that's just what's on the counter...
Josh's Pod Guide, K-cup Line-up, and Nespresso Encapsulation
User avatar
jbviau
 
Posts: 7853
Joined: Fri Aug 22, 2008 9:52 pm
Location: Pembroke Pines, FL

Re: Dissassembly + Repair Guide - Keurig B70 Platinum

Postby tim4717 » Sat Jan 19, 2013 1:27 pm

HI I was wondering if someone could help me out with this. My Keurig does the half cup / no cup it fills up just fine and I can hear the air pump running ( I took it apart and observed it working) it seems as tho there isn't enough air pressure to force the water out of the brewer. If I blow into the tube I get a full cup. Is it possible that the Air Solenoid isn't producing enough air?
tim4717
 
Posts: 1
Joined: Sat Jan 19, 2013 1:24 pm

Re: Dissassembly + Repair Guide - Keurig B70 Platinum

Postby EmmJayEff » Tue Jan 22, 2013 9:41 am

Sorry I did not reply earlier; I just saw your post.

First off, what machine (B60, B70, B77, ...) do you have?

I assume that you took the hose off of the Air Pump and blew into it to get a full cup. It is surprising how much air pressure is required to achieve this. The Air Pump really has to work hard to brew a cup of coffee, especially when there is a an extra-bold K-Cup installed.

I also assume that you meant to say that the Air Pump (not Air Solenoid) isn't producing enough air. If the path out the K-Cup Arm is clear (you should take a paperclip and give the outlet needle ports a good cleaning), then your Air Pump is too weak and you need a new one.
User avatar
EmmJayEff
 
Posts: 32
Joined: Wed May 04, 2011 3:10 pm

Re: Dissassembly + Repair Guide - Keurig B70 Platinum

Postby GetSet » Fri Jan 25, 2013 11:28 pm

Not saying it is the air pump yet, but if you are considering one, Skycraft Surplus has plenty of them, as well as plenty of water pumps also. They are much more reasonably priced than buying off of E-bay. Unfortunately, the solenoids I spoke of earlier must have been a popular item and they are out of them now.
GetSet
 
Posts: 21
Joined: Mon Dec 24, 2012 2:13 am
Location: Greenville, TX

Re: Dissassembly + Repair Guide - Keurig B70 Platinum

Postby subdewd84 » Sat Jan 26, 2013 12:58 pm

I have a Keurig B70 and disassembled it to troubleshoot a short-cupping problem. The symptoms are as follows:

1. First attempt to brew at largest size results in very small amount of brew in cup
2. Subsequent brew attempt (recyling same k-cup) results in about half size brew
3. Entire time the overflow is continuously shooting spurts back into the reservoir

There are no obvious issues visually once I disassembled the unit. I have observed operation while disassembled and the heating chamber fills to the correct level depending on the size of brew selected, the water pump works fine, I believe the air pump is working. The likely culprit in the aft solenoid valve cycling premature or an over-zealous air pump that is causing the aft solenoid to relieve to the reservoir.

Any suggestions on additional troubleshooting to confirm the errant component? If the solenoind is the issue, is there anyone on the forum that is selling them or knows how to get one?

Thanks for the help in advance.
subdewd84
 
Posts: 1
Joined: Sat Jan 26, 2013 12:46 pm

Re: Dissassembly + Repair Guide - Keurig B70 Platinum

Postby GetSet » Sun Jan 27, 2013 9:57 pm

I have not had this issue, but I have the following suggestions:

1. Make sure the upper orifice that punctures the K-cup isn't clogged.
2. It sounds like you have enough technical understanding that you might benefit from EmmJayEff's excellent theory of operation and tubing/flow schematic, if you haven't already. It is located on the 3rd page of this forum thread, about 7 posts up from the bottom.
3. Referring to this diagram: If you theorize that the aft solenoid is open during the cup dispensing step (instead of closed like it should be), then water would flow out of the overflow tube instead of the cup dispenser tube. So, you can try pinching off tubing on this valve to prevent this water flow. To locate the correct side of the valve: From the aft solenoid you mentioned, locate the circular disc shaped mesh filter in the tubing coming out of one side of it. Now go to the tubing coming out of the opposite side of the aft valve (the side that eventually leads to the overflow tube) and pinch it off, but only during the time when the cup is actually supposed to be filling up. If the valve is stuck open, then the water should stop emptying through the overflow tube and eventually start flowing better into the cup.
3(a). If pinching the tubing above improves the cup filling, then take a voltmeter and measure the voltage on the aft valve terminals and verify that during the time when the cup is actually supposed to be filling up, the voltage reads close to zero volts DC. If it does, then the control circuitry is working properly during this step, and your aft valve is probably bad. If it reads 12 volts DC, then the control circuitry is malfunctioning, and this would require further thought.
3(b). If pinching the tubing above doesn't improve the cup filling, then you could suspect either the air pump or the mesh filter. I don't recall whether anyone actually ever found the mesh filter to be clogged, but you could disconnect the tubing from the aft valve - the side that leads to the (disc shaped) mesh filter and try to blow through it to force water into the K-cup. If you can do this, then not only is the mesh filter probably clean enough, but the air pump may be suspect, if nothing else you tried above isolated any other culprits.

4. It wouldn't hurt to feel either of the valves and check their temperature. They should never get more than comfortably warm - but not hot enough to burn your fingers. If one is overly hot, than that indicates that it is shorted.

Regarding a source for getting a replacement valve, I spoke too soon about SkyCraftSurplus.com being out of them. I rechecked today and they now have 296 of them in stock at $3.50 each. This is what a surplus valve like this should cost, not the $15.00 on E-bay that some people are trying to charge. Honestly, I don't work for this company - but I'm just saying. Just type "Keurig" in the search bar there and it should show you all the Keurig parts available. The part number is SH-V0829BC. I ordered one of these from them that I used in my Keurig, plus a few spares. The one has been working fine in the Keurig since Christmas Eve, and I tested the rest by applying 12 VDC to them and blowing through them. All are good.
GetSet
 
Posts: 21
Joined: Mon Dec 24, 2012 2:13 am
Location: Greenville, TX

Re: Dissassembly + Repair Guide - Keurig B70 Platinum

Postby n8dawg » Mon Feb 04, 2013 11:32 pm

Awesome post! Fixed my problem exactly! I started taking pictures of every step because I thought it would be helpful. Then I decided the instructions are clear enough without pictures...but I had them anyway, so here they are. I forget who came up with the idea to use a K-cup as an umbrella, but I thought that was brilliant, so I did that.

Image
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image
n8dawg
 
Posts: 1
Joined: Sat Feb 02, 2013 9:52 pm

Re: Dissassembly + Repair Guide - Keurig B70 Platinum

Postby jbviau » Mon Feb 04, 2013 11:44 pm

^^^ Glad to hear it! Welcome, and thanks for the pics.
Josh - Forum Moderator
----------------------------
Bunn Trifecta MB, Nespresso D90, Baratza Preciso and OE LIDO(s), and that's just what's on the counter...
Josh's Pod Guide, K-cup Line-up, and Nespresso Encapsulation
User avatar
jbviau
 
Posts: 7853
Joined: Fri Aug 22, 2008 9:52 pm
Location: Pembroke Pines, FL

Re: Dissassembly + Repair Guide - Keurig B70 Platinum

Postby rocketman » Mon Feb 18, 2013 11:28 pm

First Post
Excellent Thread and Forum
I had a purchased-new B70 fail after two years.
Classic product development woes.
Cause: Air pump motor seizure from corrosion, solenoid failure.

I received a new B70 from Keurig for $79 plus shipping.
I briefly removed the bottom cover just to peek at what other changes besides the larger water tank were made. The new unit appears to have the paralell CV's and possibly the newer CEME solenoid valves mentioned by Jay Aitchsee as seen on the newer B60. This will be the last Keurig I purchase. To be totally honest, it will either last a lifetime or be tossed to the trash with Keurig's reputation. Jay's experience with subsequent failures is not encoraging.

That being said, I like the machine and hope Keurig has solved the problems. My wife is pretty much the only user and has a few hundred Kcups to use up.
I took apart the old machine.
Observations:

The old solenoids:
They are poor quality, but more importantly, as indicated before, terribly misapplied. The leakage can only come from a break in the plastic housing or past the internal pole piece o-ring seal. Upon disassembly, the armature, spring, and pole piece are corrosion and deposit free. The o-ring has relaxed and no longer makes a good seal. The plastic housing is discolored, indicating a compatibility issue. The inner bore of the plastic housing shows signs of disintigration, also indicating a compatibility issue. I first suspected water deposits, but cleaning with vinegar did not remove the suspect material (dull areas where the bore is normally shiny). Gentle scraping removes material. Material removed is disintigrating plastic housing material, not hard water deposits.
Conclusion: The valve was not designed to operate with mixed phase fluid or corrosives. The aggravating conditions to which the valve is exposed in normal operation include continuous coil heat, hot water, and corrosives such as clorine, ozone and vinegar. The plastic of the body and the o-ring are obviously not compatible with these conditions.
Suggestions for Keurig: Use a normally open valve with no dead space that is made of materials that are compatible with the operating conditions. A diaphram valve can have no dead space. Other than transport spillage, there is no significant reason for using a normally closed valve.

The air pump:
It has two parts. The motor with transfer section, and the pump section. The most common failure in the B70 application is the propagated failure by leakage from the solenoid above it followed by subsequent corrosion. The pump is a three chamber rubber diaphragm pump. It has six check valves, two for each chamber. The normal failure mode for this pump would be the aging and fatigue cracking of the rubber at the flex points in each chamber. This will be noticed by a decrease in the pump volume flow rate (slow or timid cup fill). The pump will continue to pump even with a perforation in one chamber because that chamber's outlet check valve will prevent back flow thru that chamber, so the remaining chambers will continue to operate until the last chamber is perforated. In the B70 application, even the slightest leakage from the solenoid above will cause a problem for the air pump. This is because the air pump draws air in from the transfer section (the section where the motor shaft, offset, wobble plate and motor mounting screws are found. The air for the pump to drive into the water heater tank can only come from this transfer section, and the flow area to allow this air into the pump is inadequate. The only dedicated flow path for this supply air is a tiny slot in the plastic of the transfer section where it sandwiches the mounting bracket against the motor housing. It is clear that any water, even a drop, that comes down the side of the motor will be sucked into the air pump intake thru the plastic transfer section/motor mount interface. That water will also wick into the mounting plate sandwich area. The corrosion of the metal motor drive housing at the shaft end, the two mounting screws inside the transfer section, and the motor output shaft bearing cause the problem. A secondary problem is that the resulting rust entered the air supply slot and clogged it up so the pump was laboring to draw in air. And if the rust particulate is drawn into any of the three air intake holes of the pump section, it may also cause problems with the tiny pump check valves' sealing, reducing pump function further. My pump looked clean and functional with the exception of highly corroded motor shaft end (siezed motor) and mounting screws and the beginning of micro cracking in the rubber chamber flex points. I used a fine tooth brush on the corroded motor bearing area, followed by a toothpick with penetrating oil, then some Pro 21 synthetic lube. I would not advise spraying lube because the plastic parts and the motor internals may not react well to transport solvents or the lube for that matter. After I broke loose the motor seizure, I pulled the offset plastic drive piece from the motor shaft for better access and to keep the plastic offset from being contaminated or damaged. After cleaning the shaft and freeing up/lubricating the motor bearing, I carefully scored the shaft (scraped with a hobby knife), degreased it with alcohol and then replaced the plastic offset. The pump should last a while longer.
Conclusion: The pump is a good design, with the exception of the air intake. Besides slowing the brewing operation, a laboring pump will stress the diaphram more and shorten air pump life. I drilled an 1/8 inch hole in the side of the transfer section and taped a filter (piece of a houshold air filter element made into a hood) over the hole to provide a clean, low resistance inlet supply. I also installed a plastic deflection sheet as others have to keep water off the pump. Water in the pump is not comming from the outlet line (and probably never has). It is being sucked into the pump inlet at the motor interface. The pump should last quite a while, longer for light users and shorter for heavy users.
Suggestions for Keurig: Misapplied, leaky and unfortunately positioned solenoid valves caused the corrosion problem for the air pump. The air pump inlet should be filtered and larger.

Other observations: The coffee maker is certainly not "Green", but powering the normally closed valves open when the unit is just plugged in (and not on) is NOT SMART from a hardware life concern. As one owner remarked, the valves are open more than 99% of the time (~99.8% by my est. if the unit is plugged in year round and brews 10 cups a day). If you calculate the power cost of the solenoids alone for that year of unneccessary power, at 12 cents per kwh, it's about 21 kwh for the two valves, so about $2.52 per year. I would at least double that figure to account for the transformer and logic overhead. But $5/year for power is a small concern if you replace a $179 piece of equipment every two years. Perhaps Keurig can comment on why this machine has this NOT SMART valve operation, but here is my guess (experience based speculation on my part):
The hardware design guys wanted to save some money by buying the cheapest valve they could apply. They did not understand the environment and selected a normally closed valve because they thought it best to close up the system (prevent spillage) when the unit is unplugged and transported. They also thought the valve would only see air and warm water vapor. The hardware design was mostly complete and so now hard to change, so now enter the software guys. The software guys were told by the brewer guys that the first program resulted in latent dribbling of water after the cup had been brewed and removed. This was traced to the valves being closed and the water heater tank contents expanding and forcing extra water out. They fixed this by powering the valves to keep them open whenever the unit is plugged in and not brewing. They were happy because this also solved another problem of the unit dribbling due to residual thermal expansion and contraction of the water heater contents even when the unit was powered off. The hardware guys either were retired or laying low as problems with early failures started to show up. Management started screeming at the engineering team with customer support reports in their hands. A lot of money was lost and the quickest and cheapest fix was to replace the valves and not to change the software. Customer support was told not to tell customers the truth and to instruct customers to continue with trouble shooting that is both damaging and ineffective. (Driving a paper clip up into the three holes of the piercing needle perforates the silicone delivery tube; Too many vinegar treatments hastens the corrosion of the valve bodies and subsequently the air pump motor interface.)

Suggestions to users:
1. Use distilled water in your unit. It costs the same as bottled water but has no minerals. (Interesting fact: Read the labels. Some "distilled water" that you buy is only RO filtered and not distilled, but don't worry, RO and deionized water are virtually as pure).
2. After your last cup for a while, wait for completion of the cycle, then remove power from the unit when not in use. remove the last Kcup and leave a cup under the spout to catch any dribbles.
3. When you are not going to use the unit for several days or more, take the water reservoir off and place in the fridge. This inhibits bacterial growth in the water reservoir since stagnant (not resupplied with fresh) water in the reservoir loses its bacteriocide (typicallly chlorine or ozone) and starts to grow slime.
4. In order to pop the top off your B70 for the first time (I broke 1 of the 4 clips), drill and use the strategically placed holes (1/16" dia is sufficient) to access the 4 clips. With top off, bevel (file/sand) the clip retaining surfaces on the top clips from their 90 degree design to a more easily popped-off 45 degrees. Then you can pop the top off for easy access in the future without using the holes or extreme plastic breaking stresses. I thought I saw somewhere in the thread a description of the exact placement of the holes, so anyone with this information, please poste again. Otherwise I will provide hole placement dimensions.

Keurig, are you listening? Make your devices more user servicable. Consumers are not stupid. They are quite capable. Failure to do so and hiding (or not helping with) problems and solutions just adds to the belief that the designers are "unsmart" and the company is unconcerned. Trashed units are costly to you and to the customers. It would be win-win to be more helpful. If you don't believe me. Try this: Purchase several hundred new type solenoids and new air pumps. Place them on amazon or ebay or someplace reputable, with a markup only large enough to pay for your trouble. Have someone put a link in this forum to that sale and see how fast they sell.

Happy brewing
rocketman
 
Posts: 3
Joined: Mon Feb 18, 2013 3:25 am

Re: Dissassembly + Repair Guide - Keurig B70 Platinum

Postby jbviau » Mon Feb 18, 2013 11:51 pm

Welcome, rocketman. Your input is much appreciated.

Aside: I understand why you'd recommend brewing with distilled water, but I read all the time that its lack of minerals will lead to less tasty coffee. Have you tried it with your B70? If so, notice a difference in the cup?
Josh - Forum Moderator
----------------------------
Bunn Trifecta MB, Nespresso D90, Baratza Preciso and OE LIDO(s), and that's just what's on the counter...
Josh's Pod Guide, K-cup Line-up, and Nespresso Encapsulation
User avatar
jbviau
 
Posts: 7853
Joined: Fri Aug 22, 2008 9:52 pm
Location: Pembroke Pines, FL

Re: Dissassembly + Repair Guide - Keurig B70 Platinum

Postby imecoli » Wed Feb 20, 2013 2:15 am

I picked up a used B70 for my office at work. After a couple of weeks it started to slow down. I saw another post about the pump so I decided to try to fix it. I pulled the unit apart and oiled the pump to free it up. It solved the problem for a couple of months. Once again it started to act up again and I found this forum. I ordered a new pump and solenoid and put the umbrella Kcup over the pump. I just got done replacing the parts and it works fine once again. I decided to take the pump apart and post pics of the damage from water.

https://plus.google.com/photos/111064512197697768107/albums/5846908962198931057
imecoli
 
Posts: 1
Joined: Wed Feb 20, 2013 12:46 am

Re: Dissassembly + Repair Guide - Keurig B70 Platinum

Postby rocketman » Wed Feb 20, 2013 7:13 am

Does anyone have a source for the newer CEME solenoid valves (pictured by Jay Aitchsee » Sat Jul 21, 2012 )?
rocketman
 
Posts: 3
Joined: Mon Feb 18, 2013 3:25 am

Re: Dissassembly + Repair Guide - Keurig B70 Platinum

Postby rocketman » Wed Feb 20, 2013 9:30 am

Re: Josh
"I understand why you'd recommend brewing with distilled water, but I read all the time that its lack of minerals will lead to less tasty coffee."

I guess it's a matter of personal taste. Some may like minerals or even chlorine taste. I don't. I have had experiences with lots of different water sources. The best tasting water I've ever had was from a spring in the Colorado mountains that was "mined" by driving a "V" shaped log into the side of the hill it was trickling out of. There was a lot of decaying wood in that water's path providing a natural carbon filtration. It was clear, tart and tasty compared to the city water I grew up with. Among the worst tasting is my college town water that is highly mineralized. I find the taste of both de-ionized water and distilled water remind me of that tasty spring water. The purest water you can find is extremely filtered de-ionized water like what I have used in water electrolysis units. In engineering, many operating systems are just a balance of good and bad effects. All taste issues asside, there are good and bad effects for using mineralized water as well as purified (distilled, DI, RO etc.). In simplified terms, purified water is in some ways more chemically active (and potentially damaging) than mineralized water. On the other hand, mineralized water will leave minerals when it evaporates in heated systems, like coffee makers. Engineers who build coffee machines, for the most part, know these things and design the internal wetted surfaces of the machine using materials that are resistant to the corrosive effects of water. Keurig has done a marvelous job of this throughout the B70 unit with only one noted exception that I have found (the plastic body material in the old style solenoids). Most reports (and my experiences as well) tell of a marvelously clean interior of the machine even after years of service. So water corrosion due to chemical activity of the water is not nearly the issue that water deposits can be. Water deposits (mineral salts buildup from internal evaporation) can happen on any surface and is a function of local heating and the mineral content of the water. Since most people will use whatever water is conveniently available to them, Keurig correctly stresses the importance of the de-mineralization process (vinegar rinse) to remove any scale buildup. And Keurig has built into their software a sensing algorithm that "guesses" when there is a problem with scale buildup, and flashes a "DESCALE" message on the screen. My guess is that the pump and solenoid problems play havoc with that sensing algorithm, causing false positive as well as failure to sense a real mineral buildup problem. In my failed machine, which was indicating "DESCALE" on and off again, performing the descale procedure multiple times had no effect. This is probably because we had always used distilled water in the machine and there was no significant mineral buildup problem. I do find myself wondering if the 2 gallons of vinegar that was ultimately run through the machine caused some of the damage to the solenoid bodies, so my suggestion to others as well as how we treat our new machine is to only descale the machine as often as your mineral content would suggest. If the mineral content of the water you use is higher than the national average, descale proportionately more often than Keurig suggests. If the mineral content of the water you use is less, certainly don't descale any more often than Keurig suggests. Vinegar solves one problem (mineral buildup) and creates other problems (chemical attack), so the descale procedure should only be run in moderation (when necessary).
rocketman
 
Posts: 3
Joined: Mon Feb 18, 2013 3:25 am

Re: Dissassembly + Repair Guide - Keurig B70 Platinum

Postby BoldJavaLover » Wed Feb 20, 2013 9:38 pm

Hey does anyone know yet if the VUE is more reliable or is it same old bad design in a new package?
Mike

Platinum B70
User avatar
BoldJavaLover
 
Posts: 4
Joined: Fri Dec 28, 2007 12:28 pm
Location: Raleigh NC

PreviousNext

Return to Single Serve Coffee Machines

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 3 guests